Bipolar Disorder is incurable, but…


I have Bipolar Disorder but, I am currently in remission and stable. This means almost nothing because Bipolar Disorder is incurable. It will at some time come back. Right now I am managing it with medications.

I have Bipolar Disorder but, I have to worry every time I feel emotions that are part of Bipolar Disorder, but that other people feel as well. I may be coming out of remission. Bipolar Disorder is incurable.

I have Bipolar Disorder but, constantly in the back of my mind is the daily fear that today will be the day my remission ends. Bipolar Disorder is incurable. We never know when our remission will end.

I have Bipolar Disorder but, I am managing it with medications. Medications can fail at anytime. Bipolar Disorder is incurable.

I have Bipolar Disorder but, I am not contagious. Bipolar Disorder is incurable, but you cannot catch it from me.

I have Bipolar Disorder but, that doesn’t make me automatically a violent person. I have never lost control to the point that I hurt anyone, but myself. Bipolar Disorder is incurable, but doesn’t make me more apt to commit horrible crimes than anyone else.

BIPOLAR DISORDER IS INCURABLE, BUT WE ARE STILL HUMAN BEINGS. WE CAN BE LOVING AND KIND AND WE HURT WHEN WE ARE TREATED UNFAIRLY. THE STIGMA NEEDS TO BE BANISHED. MENTAL DISORDERS ARE LIKE ANY OTHER ILLNESS AND NEED FAIR MEDICAL TREATMENTS AND FAIR TREATMENT FROM THE WORLD.

WE CAN LIVE QUIETLY AND HARMLESS IN THE SOCIETY AROUND US. PLEASE DON’T TREAT US DIFFERENTLY! DROP THE STIGMA!

Tessa

44 thoughts on “Bipolar Disorder is incurable, but…

      1. Harmonie

        Yes, certainly, I understand, that’s the bitter truth. It is a lack of knowledge and understanding that makes them assume terrible things about people with psychological problems. Many people assume that they’re dangerous. But the truth is they need love and support more than anyone else.
        You are surely doing a great job. It is nice that you’re sharing your experiences with us. Probably it will make a difference and change such illogical hunches. 😀
        Best wishes, take care. Love.
        You are a very great person! I feel proud and inspired by the way you’re not only coping with the issues but also spending a very meaningful message! 🙂

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  1. hallenterprises132

    Unfortunately, I doubt the stigma of mental illness will ever be accepted. There are more people with mental illness functioning around us every day with no problems. It is not like we have flashing warning signs on our heads warning children to stay away or anything!

    Liked by 1 person

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    1. Tessa Post author

      True but if one person is changed that is one more against stigma. Gotta try. The more people on our side the more people we have a chance to change. Thank you for you comments.

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  2. morgueticiaatoms

    I was watching Most Evil in which they were doing brainscans on psychopaths who had committed rape and murder. It showed minute differences compared to non psychotic brains, yet every single one had the common ground of past abuse, mental illness, and some sort of brain injury.

    There’s no way of knowing who will become violent but the scans show the ones who do, generally don’t suffer from mental illness alone but a mixture of the other stuff as well. Mental disorders alone do not make one violent.

    Liked by 2 people

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  3. Bipolarbrainiac

    Is this Tessa’s reply box? Or is it the reply box of the person who reblogged this? Either way ok, I’m just new at this blog stuff.

    I also find myself living in fear that my bipolar remission will end. My greatest fear is that they will try all the meds and I will be in a perpetual state of waiting and none of them will work for me. Because I write and wrote an article all about antidepressant failure over my history, I know what’s worked and for how long for my entire history. I have discovered twice that you can go back to a med that worked in the distant past and odds are good it might work again. So listing experiences is helpful, at least helped me. Keep a journal of what has worked for you and what hasn’t, because I suggested a medication that I took successfully from 2000-2007 without a relapse and thought that it just might work again. I happened to be correct. The internet is becoming less reliable due to all those commercial sites where people write their experiences (which may vary depending what else they are on, if they drink or not etc)
    and then the company, which has got a lot of eyeballs and clicks sells ads and pays Google for it to be the first result when you search.

    I suggested a past med, and It took all of four days to feel a flickering of a light bulb, have a good day alternating with a bad day and it took 8 days to completely escape the depression. Thank God. I was worried. These meds don’t work forever. I mean, lithium does, if you can tolerate the strain it puts on your internal organs over time, and my mood stabilizers have probably remained effective but my antidepressants have petered in and out, every single one of them.

    I am just about 9 days out of a six week depression relapse. I do certain things that I think cause the brain to release healthy chemicals. And then I knock on wood like the rest of us. Like do things with friends, exercise, explore new music through ITunes based on the remaining radio charts and the Times. I support the New York Times (while it still is functioning) and avoid unhealthy foods. It’s hard though. I put myself on a food plan and when I follow it I have less cravings. Then hubby brings home Swedish fish, knowing it’s my favorite food.

    I had meant to go to a Nami meeting at 4:00pm but fell asleep after watching ‘Humans’ (an exciting and humanistic sci fi about artificial intelligence people bought and sold on marketplace as helpers, maids) I mean, I think getting enough sleep and relaxing activities either alone or with loved ones is good. I also think having pets are good.
    Allison

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    1. Tessa Post author

      Allison this is mine (Tessa’s) comment box. You got it right. This is my first real remission and I am terrified it will end soon on me. I hope not. I feel slightly normal now and I don’t want to lost that feeling. It is the closest I am going to come to being normal. I am working on my writing skills and about my Bipolar especially. Trying to get added to a Bipolar website. And I had one my posts added as an article to a website. I am trying to do something productive here with the stigma and even though I am stable right now I want to keep writing about it.

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  4. Amy

    I love this post. Thank you so much for having the courage to write it. I agree. We have to get rid of the stigma. Remission is a beautiful time. Enjoy it.

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    1. Tessa Post author

      I want to figure out how to advocate for all the so-called invisible illnesses. There is too much stigma out there and if you suffer with one you usually have another too. I have many, physical and mental.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  5. Cat in the Cactus

    Love your openness Tessa. But I really think “mental Illness” (Gosh I hate that word) is becoming more tolerated, because everybody knows someone who has it in some form. And when someone you love has even suffered anxiety or depression, you realise that anyone that has any of these conditions needs support and love and encouragement. I think the stigma really is going. I hope what I say is true, anyway. And I hope you and others that have these illnesses really don’t feel judged.

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    1. Tessa Post author

      Unfortunately the stigma is still rampant. I read the blogs of fellow bloggers with mental illness and half of them or more cannot get good medical care for it and their families aren’t supportive. Mine is supportive and I have good mental healthcare, but I am in the minority still. Hopefully one day things will be better.

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  6. matterstosam

    This is so well written and true! I feel the same way about my depression, anxiety, self harm ETC symptoms can come back at anytime. The most important thing is a good support system and good ways of keeping healthy like meds and therapy and talking about it here with others who get it.

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    1. Tessa Post author

      Thank you very much for the kind comments. I have a lot of mental issues, but my biggest problem is the Bipolar Disorder. You are right though. They can all come back.

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  7. tripleclicka

    Followed your link from OM at Harsh Reality. I am glad I did. I posted something today that is along the lines of stigma. It would be nice to see that disappear. Thank you for your post.

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    1. Tessa Post author

      Thank you for following the link and the nice comments. I am working on getting rid of stigma. One blogger actually told me today that stigma is gone and that families and friends are supportive. Even some mental health drs aren’t supportive. Actually her post is on this post. I don’t believe stigma is gone and I have been lucky to be treated well. I feel for my friends with no support and terrible drs.

      Liked by 1 person

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      1. tripleclicka

        It seems the stigma is alive and doing fine. I don’t believe it will ever be completely gone. People are never going to be educated enough about everything in life that they are afraid of and that is what it is with some people. Others it is an excuse to hurt another person. Ignorance can be taught, stupid can not.

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      1. Janice Wald

        How kind of you. Sadly, self-hosted bloggers can not be reblogged. However, if you ever see fit to link to my site, I would really appreciate it. Not only would it give my new site exposure, it would increase my SEO ranking which I need to get back up again now that I moved. Thank you for wanting to help me. Nice meeting you on Saturday.
        Janice

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  8. alfgarnet

    Tessa , hunny, my very good friend I remember you once telling me all you wanted was to tell your story and help others well hunny you are and this blog alone proves it , , hunny you have found your niche here, stigma need to be shouted from the rooftops , as you have done and written with so much dedication and straight from your heart as only you do,, take care and keep blogging and fighting for what you beleive in , xxxxxx

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  9. writing, writing, words words words.

    Hi Tessa, I saw your comment on Alfgarnet and especially liked it. I have some BPD and PTSD but my most pressing issue these days is three compression fractures in the thoracic region of my back, and doctors shoving mass doses of NSADs at me like their doing me a favor. I’d been telling my doc for three years that my back hurt but it wasn’t until I finally got X-rays that they found the fractures. And she’d taken me off my hormone replacement therapy bcuz she believed the skewed studies done by WHI. Which aggravated my new-to-me diagnosis of severe osteoporosis. Boy, if one’s condition doesn’t depress one, the docs are standing in line to make sure it happens. Not depressed all the time, just when I think about doctors, any doctors. Wondering how they’d fare walking along on a broken leg with nothing but NSAIDs. I’m thinking of moving to Portugal lol. In the meantime I’ll be doctor shopping until I find a compassionate one. Yes, doctor shopping for drugs, like a diabetic shops for insulin. Be well. xo.

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