Tag Archives: Physical Illness

Fibromyalgia Symptoms: Morning Stiffness, Pain & More, Facing the First Problems of the Day


Fibromyalgia Symptoms: Morning Stiffness, Pain & More

Facing the First Problems of the Day By Adrienne Dellwo

Some of the pain we face first thing in the morning.

Teresa (Tessa) Dean Smeigh

-Advocate for Mental and Invisible Illnesses

-Author of Articles, Stories and Poems

http://www.tessacandoit.com

http://www.finallyawriter.wordpress.com (no longer canceling this blog, just not adding new work to it, sign up for http://www.tessacandoit.com for the new posts).

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Epidural done yesterday, feeling much better


The local anesthesia was the worst part. Didn’t feel the actual steroid injection. By the time I got my pain pill a couple of hours later it took a couple of hours to start feeling better.

I could turn over in bed without the resulting pain and this morning getting out of bed was easier. I can walk easier, not all stiff and little steps as I did with that terrible pain. I haven’t felt this well in decades.

Ruby I kept your prayer cloth in my pocket right next to where they were working. It gave me comfort. Thank you to you and your church for praying for me.

Teresa (Tessa) Dean Smeigh

-Advocate for Mental and Invisible Illnesses

-Author of Articles, Stories and Poems

http://www.tessacandoit.com

http://www.finallyawriter.wordpress.com (no longer canceling this blog, just not adding new work to it, sign up for http://www.tessacandoit.com for the new posts).

Gender’s Role as a Fibromyalgia Risk Factor – By adrienne Dellwo


Though Fibromyalgia is suffered by a larger majority of women than men, men also do suffer the painful effects of Fibro.

 

Teresa (Tessa) Dean Smeigh

-Advocate for Mental and Invisible Illnesses

-Author of Articles, Stories and Poems

http://www.tessacandoit.com

http://www.finallyawriter.wordpress.com (no longer canceling this blog, just not adding new work to it, sign up for http://www.tessacandoit.com for the new posts).

Cooking With Fibromyalgia & Chronic Fatigue Syndrome – By Adrienne Dellwo


When you have fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue syndrome, cooking poses a lot of challenges—standing in the kitchen can cause pain and wear you out; problems with short-term memory and multi-tasking make it hard to follow the steps of even a simple recipe; and it’s easy to get frustrated and overwhelmed with the whole process.

It can be tempting to avoid it altogether, but that’s not realistic for most of us. Sick or not, we have to eat. Because many of us with these conditions need a specially tailored diet, or at least feel better when we eat healthier, cooking is essential.

Fortunately, there’s a lot you can do to simplify cooking and ease its strain on your body.

READ THE REST OF THE ARTICLE FOR SUGGESTIONS BY ADRIENNE DELLWO

 

 

Teresa (Tessa) Dean Smeigh

-Advocate for Mental and Invisible Illnesses

-Author of Articles, Stories and Poems

http://www.tessacandoit.com

http://www.finallyawriter.wordpress.com (no longer canceling this blog, just not adding new work to it, sign up for http://www.tessacandoit.com for the new posts).

5 Common Misconceptions About Fibromyalgia BY Justina Bonilla


Having fibromyalgia for almost 21 years, I have heard an array of comments about fibromyalgia, from positive to negative. Yet, over the years, I’ve noticed certain comments are reoccurring. While I understand that most people don’t know that much about fibromyalgia, there are still many misconceptions.

1. “You don’t take painkillers, so you must not be in a lot of pain.”

As odd as it sounds, I’m allergic to all over-the-counter painkillers, as well as multiple prescription painkillers. I was diagnosed with fibromyalgia before puberty. But, when I began puberty, my pain became unbearable. To deal with the pain, my doctors experimented with multiple treatments plans, with both over-the-counter and prescription painkillers. Eventually, I started to have allergic reactions to these treatments.  They quickly became severe anaphylactic reactions. Because of the multiple serious allergic reactions, I had no choice but to turn to alternative pain treatments.

2. “You don’t look like you’re in that much pain.”

Since fibromyalgia patients experience pain on a spectrum, everyone can tolerate a different level of daily pain. Growing up with fibromyalgia and unable to take any painkillers, I grew a custom to tolerate a high level of pain. I had no choice. Though this has helped me to function with high pain levels, it has made it difficult for others to understand my high pain tolerance. This has led others, including doctors, to think that since I’m not bent over in pain and on painkillers, like some fibromyalgia patients, I must not be in a lot of pain – or even have fibromyalgia. Just because I don’t fit the typical appearance of a fibromyalgia patient, that does not mean I’m not in a lot of pain.

3. “If you can dance, then you must not have back issues.”

As someone who loves to dance, I was heartbroken when I had to stop dancing altogether because of my fibromyalgia pain. But, through the recommendation of family, I found belly dancing. Since belly dancing focuses on flexibility and is less demanding on your body than other dances, like jazz tap, I can dance and not have to worry about having issues with post-dancing pains. As an added bonus, both my doctors and physical therapists saw it as a great form of exercise for me. Though dancing with back issues can be challenging, that does not always mean you can’t dance at all.

4. “It’s all in your head.”

Unfortunately, this is the most common criticism about any invisible illness or chronic illness. Though I’ve grown to accept that not everyone is going to believe that fibromyalgia exists, it only becomes a concern of mine when the comments come from medical professionals. I’ve had pediatricians, pain specialists, and even two school nurses, try to tell me what I felt was not real. This is concerning because it not only delays the correct treatment for someone who needs it, but it also makes the person hesitant to seek proper treatment. It’s bad enough dealing with this as an adult, but it hurts twice as much when you’re a child. You become afraid to speak up about anything in your life, whether it’s your physical pain, or being bullied at school.

5. “You don’t have Fibromyalgia, you have…”

This, by far, is the most frustrating comment for me to deal with. It bothers me more than, “It’s all in your head.” While I appreciate anyone who is trying to help me, I don’t like people trying to diagnose me, especially when they have little to no knowledge of my medical history. I’ve had people from a massage therapist to a manicurist try to diagnosis me. The most common illnesses people try to diagnosis me with are lupus, Lyme disease, and arthritis.

Despite telling people about the multiple verifications of my fibromyalgia diagnosis, by multiple specialists, including a neurological psychiatrist, and tests (both blood and physical) ruling out other chronic illnesses, many still insist on diagnosing me. While I don’t mind others sharing their similar experiences and/or their loved one’s experiences, I don’t want others to tell me what I do or do not have.

While fibromyalgia symptoms can be challenging to cope with, the misconceptions can be far more challenging to deal with. For those of us with fibromyalgia, the best thing that we can do to deal with the misconceptions is to be informed about fibromyalgia. You cannot dispel the fibromyalgia myths if you don’t understand what fibromyalgia is. Though we are not all doctors, we can be informed about what we have and how to help ourselves. Because the best advocate for yourself is you.

BY

Tears – a poem


Tears by Teresa Smeigh October 2017

The tears are coursing down my cheek,

The pain is bad, I am not weak.

My foot is numb, my hands are too.

The pain is like the turn of the screw.

 

I cannot stand nor walk you see.

Somewhere else I’d rather be.

I can’t lie down, or sit upright,

What can I do, this isn’t right!

 

To my Lord I do pray

Give me strength that I may stay.

I shouldn’t have to live like this

No one should I loudly hiss.

 

Teresa (Tessa) Dean Smeigh

-Advocate for Mental and Invisible Illnesses

-Author of Articles, Stories and Poems

http://www.tessacandoit.com

http://www.finallyawriter.wordpress.com (moving posts to other blog and will be deleting this one).

 

 

Jittery!!


Several people including my son, best friend and dad have told me to quit googling what is wrong with me and how they treat it and especially the surgery that is possible. All I am doing is upsetting myself and my son says it is bringing out the negativity in me. He is probably right. My mind tends to go to the negative first no matter what. I can’t just think about something and be positive about it.

I think it has helped me understand what might happen and that people have come out of it and recovered for the most part. Having a physical therapist tell you that you should never have back or neck surgery because most people are worse off afterwards sure didn’t help and that was 7 years ago when I tried the physical therapy for my then pinched nerves. Now the physical therapy didn’t help. We moved on to the steroid shots and surgery was not on the table. Now it is.

I hate the wait. Give me all these things that might be and might go wrong and then tell me I have to wait over a month and a half or more for someone to make a decision and of course it wasn’t the person I was seeing in the orthopedic office. It goes orthopedic, pain management and then possibly a surgeon or maybe not.

How is a person supposed to be positive when all this is going on and taking so long for answers. Before the current tests were done surgery was not on the table according to orthopedic office and now after the results surgery is suddenly very much an option and he was able to rush that cervical MRI right through when the results were added to the request. I was barely out of the driveway and the first one took a week. What am I supposed to think?

Teresa (Tessa) Dean Smeigh

-Advocate for Mental and Invisible Illnesses

-Author of Articles, Stories and Poems

http://www.tessacandoit.com

http://www.finallyawriter.wordpress.com (moving posts to other blog and will be deleting this one).